Pigeon Feed and Prison Time

rattlesnakesahead2 Pigeon Feed and Prison Time

Beware The Public Serpent

It has been reported recently that Chicago Alderman James Cappelman has a thing for pigeons and those people who feed them, but not in the way that you might think.

Apparently, some people feel that pigeons have become a scourge at Daley Plaza, and Mr. Cappelman is one person who would like to see them eradicated with prejudice.

But that’s not all. He stands behind a new ordinance that would significantly increase the punishments for feeding pigeons. His legislation would make it a crime punishable by a fine up to $1000 and a jail term as long as six months in prison.

Obviously, the penalties for unlawful pigeon feeding that currently exist under city code are simply not harsh enough and one must exact a pound of flesh where one can. Cappelman’s proposal doubles the maximum allowable fine and adds the possibility of jail time.

Now perhaps the idea of being arrested for the frivolous act of feeding a bird makes you pause. But they are quite serious in Chicago and Denver and New York and more and more places in this once free republic. It is an evil wonder of the ages.

The first hand reports trickle down in a steadily increasing stream. Bureaucrats across the land are using administrative decrees and color of law to criminalize otherwise harmless acts in an effort to demoralize and intimidate average citizens. These so called “authorities” now dictate what you may or may not do on your own private property or public commons. It is always done under the auspices and protections of the public good.

In some jurisdictions it is illegal to grow a home garden, tend a few chickens for some backyard fresh eggs, or even feed your local wild birds at your well weathered bird feeder.

I’ve often wondered just how many laws and regulations that I unknowingly break each and every day. What would the founding fathers of the United States have to say about that?

I believe that they would just say no, and that they would shout it so loud that it would hurt the ears of mere mortals.

Perhaps a small protest is in order. But don’t resist too strongly, lest you welcome a visit from the now ubiquitous taser and the steady tap tap tap of that merciless river of pain.

Either way, there will be more senseless and dehumanizing laws on the books tomorrow. They will appear at the hand of those who make the rules as surely as hot fire loves the dancing flame. Found guilty until proven innocent, and without a jury of your peers, judgement will be swift and sure and may carry serious or compounding penalties.

The police state rises as you grab another hand of bird seed, and it will not rest until they make criminals of us all. This type of unmitigated power grab will only stop when “we the people” stand up and decide to stop it, one feathered friend, and one dangerous bureaucrat at a time.

After all, do you really wish to go to jail, or lose your life, over a hungry and hopeful pigeon?

_________________________________________________________________________

*Color of Law n. – the appearance of an act being performed based upon legal right or enforcement of statute, when in reality no such right exists. An outstanding example is found in the civil rights acts which penalize law enforcement officers for violating civil rights by making arrests “under color of law” of peaceful protestors or to disrupt voter registration. It could apply to phony traffic arrests in order to raise revenue from fines or extort payoffs to forget the ticket.

Food Freedom!

Michael Patrick McCarty

Link To Original Article Here.

You Might Also Like Bureaucrats and The Saga of The Backyard Chicken

 

This entry was posted in You Can't Make This Up News and tagged , , , , on by .

About Michael Patrick McCarty

Michael Patrick McCarty earned a B.S. Degree in Wildlife Biology from Colorado State University. He has worked in a variety of capacities relating to fisheries and wildlife biology, water and environmental quality, and outdoor recreation. A lifelong shooter, bowhunter and outdoorsman, he has hunted and fished throughout North America. A used and rare book dealer for more than 25 years, he offers a catalog of fine titles in the fields of natural history, angling, the shooting sports, farming, and agriculture. “I have a passion for old books, slow food, pigeons, the pursuit of bugling elk, fish and game cookery, heritage poultry breeds, personal freedom, and the Rocky Mountains, to name just a few, and not necessarily in that order. I consider the White River National Forest of Western Colorado as part of my backyard”. Mike writes about an assortment of outdoor and food related topics. “I am particularly interested in the nexus between the desire to provide one’s own food, and the withering array of local, state, and federal laws and regulations which often stand in the way. It is the manner in which they all relate to the cornerstone issues of personal freedom and liberty that concerns me. For me, it’s where the rubber meets the road”.